The Thought That Counts
Previous Show
Ages 4 to 7 year olds
Dates 2005 and 2007
3 men hold a large sphere with a woman projected onto it above their heads
©Robert Workman
"It’s magical," murmurs a little chap behind me. It is. It is also beautiful, innovative and the best of children’s theatre around."
- Total Theatre

About the Show

How big is a million? Is there a man in the moon? What colour is music? Can I touch Light?

A child’s curiosity is endless. And asking questions is often more important than finding the answer.

The Thought that Counts is a playful and enchanting celebration for 4–7 year olds of how we learn through play. Taking its inspiration from the notion that a genius is someone who, like children, keeps asking questions, the show creates a magical world using theatre, dance, animated shapes, puppetry and video.

"Life may be black and white, but the imagination is vivid and running riot in this latest piece from Theatre-Rites, the company that has put play into the play and produced some of our most outstanding theatre of the past decade." - The Guardian
Cristina Catalina

2005 and 2007 Tours

Matt Costain

2005

James Daniel Wilson

2007 Tour

Renford Fagan

2005

Steven Lim

2007 Tour

Zoot Lynam

2005 and 2007 Tour

Mohsen Nouri

2005 and 2007 Tour

Sue Buckmaster
Director
Sophia Clist
Visual Artist
Carl Stevenson
Digital Artist / Animator
Jonathan Cooper
Composer
Anna Williams
Choreographer
Philippe Cherbonnier
Dramaturg
Aideen Malone
Lighting Designer
Liam Jarvis
Assistant Director
Lieutske Visser
Costume Supervisor
Namhee Kwon
Bursary Artist
Peter Hamilton
Maker of inflatable puppet and large sphere
"It’s magical," murmurs a little chap behind me. It is. It is also beautiful, innovative and the best of children’s theatre around."
- Total Theatre
"Life may be black and white, but the imagination is vivid and running riot in this latest piece from Theatre-Rites, the company that has put play into the play and produced some of our most outstanding theatre of the past decade."
- The Guardian
"This play lacks the rose-tinted view of childhood that afflicts so much children’s theatre and literature. It doesn’t try to hide the fact that being a child is often difficult and frightening. But it also asks what should it be like to be a child? The answer, like the show, is lots of fun."
- The Guardian